The Prophet Who Did Not Drown

Habakkuk was one of the Old Testament (OT) prophets and author of the OT book named after him. His name is a lot easier for me to say than to spell. He is somewhat a mystery because of the 66 books of the Bible, his name only appears in his book twice – in the first verse and first verse in the third chapter. There’s no mention of his hometown or parents or tribe. He doesn’t say where he resided but some Bible scholars concluded he lived in Jersalem at the time he wrote his book. He does provide his title “the prophet”.

Habakkuk must have chosen not to write about himself. There’s nothing wrong with that. His focus wasn’t on himself, but on what he saw and the “why” of it. He saw famine. He saw injustice. Something was eating at him and it was what he saw as God’s uninvolvement in the world. He wanted to see God at work, particularly in the area of justice for those who did evil. Habakkuk lamented but who can’t relate to that. If one is a stranger to lament, then one is a rare bird!

I haven’t figured out, don’t expect I ever will, of how much control I have of what happens to me or around me. But I do have a say in how I respond to it. Instead of throwing tantrums, blaming God, Habakkuk prayed. His book is mostly a conversation between him and God. These conversations led to something amazing for the prophet. Judging from Habakkuk 3:17-19, he was able to praise even in the middle of a drought.

Habakkuk 3:17-19

17 Although the fig tree shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in the vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut off from the fold, and there shall be no herd in the stalls:

18 Yet I will rejoice in the Lord, I will joy in the God of my salvation.

3:19 The LORD God is my strength, and he will make my feet like hinds’ feet, and he will make me to walk upon mine high places. To the chief singer on my stringed instruments.

One would think there’s no joy in famine, but Habakkuk found something to rejoice about. God hadn’t left him. Because of God, the prophet had hope there was an end to the famine. He had hoped the sweet would come. Verse 19 speaks of the deer who is known for being fast on its feet and ability to jump over any obstacle. We all have a race and it’s called life and it sure has its obstacles!  Don’t we all know it!

Decades ago, I recall watching a TV episode from the show, “The Walton’s”. If you remember watching the original episodes, you are probably a baby boomer. For those of you who aren’t boomers or have no idea what I’m referring to, the show was about a family living through the Great Depression. The Depression was “real” and one of the worse famines this country had ever faced. Some members of the Walton family were gathered around the front porch awaiting word of the fate of a loved one who was in some sort of danger. It was one of those terrifying moments of hoping for the best while fearing the worst. Grandma Walton told them that they should all pray. One of the grandchildren asked Grandma, “How can you still keep believing in God?” Grandma said, “Who else do I have to believe in?”

Although it was a TV show, I kept the words of the grandmother in my memory. I thought she made a good point with her question. Who else? Well, there’s me, but I don’t think so. I have weaknesses. I have limitations. God has none.

There’s an old saying that one’s life can change in the twinkling of an eye. That is true. A whole host of calamities can happen in seconds. But there’s the flip side of the coin. A whole host of wonderful can too.

Just as there is sour, there is sweet. On any given day, there are folks leaving this earth and grieving loved ones behind; however, there are babies coming into it being welcomed by eager adults, some of whom are carrying “It’s a …” balloons and/or a box of cigars. There are evil acts committed around the clock, but there’s also many acts of kindness by those responding to the Lord’s conviction on their hearts.

A quote comes to my mind: Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass. It’s about learning how to dance in the storm.  Habakkuk knew how.  He lamented but he didn’t drown in it.

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