An Old Testament Contest

One of the constants in our unpredictable world is contests.  In small towns and big cities, throughout the world, there are ordinary scenes of kids playing hopscotch on the sidewalk, teens playing games on the school fields, and senior citizens playing dominoes in community centers.  Contests are something most all of us can relate to.  My own personal favorite is a contest with my tennis ball and racket against a tennis practice wall.  The wall always wins though.

In the Bible, there was a big contest that took place in I Kings, chapter 18.  It was one of the most remarkable Bible stories where there was an actual contest between God and Baal.  Talk about a showdown!  The winner of this contest was determined by which of the two proved to be the true God.

In 1 Kings 18:19 the prophet Elijah asked King Ahab to gather all of Israel to meet him at Mount Carmel.  The King was a Baal fan and didn’t much care for Elijah’s God or for that matter, Elijah.  The Israelites would be the spectators in this contest.  Elijah also asked the 450 prophets of Baal and the 400 prophets of Asherah to make an appearance as well.

Elijah issued the contest rules.  He and the pagan prophets would each have a slain bull as a burnt offering.  The objective of the contest was for Elijah to call out to God and the pagan prophets call out to Bael to sent fire down to burn up the sacrifice.  The contest winner would be which of the two, God or Baal, who would respond with fire consuming the burnt offering.

The pagan priests did their level best to get Baal’s attention.  They did their chanting and dancing around their bull from morning until noon but to no avail.  They might as well had been dancing to a fence post.  Elijah couldn’t resist making fun of their efforts to get Baal’s attention.  He suggested that maybe Baal was deep in thought, or maybe was away on a trip, or perhaps taking a nap. (1 King 18:27)

Then it was Elijah’s turn up to bat, so to speak.  He requested that they first fill four jars with water and pour it on his burnt offering and on the wood.  Elijah was raising the stakes because water-logged wood is harder to burn. He even said to do it again a second time and then a third.  Thus, water was running around the altar and the trench was also filled with water. (1 King 18:34-35)  Elijah wanted the spectators to know he was not playing any dirty tricks on them.

After Elijah prayed, fire consumed the slain bull, the wood, stones, and dust, and even licked up the water that was in the trench.  (1 King 18:38).  I try to imagine the looks on the faces of the 450 Baal prophets.  Surely there wasn’t a smiling face among them.  They might have wished they had been on Elijah’s side.

This contest was not Elijah’s idea.  I believe it was God who orchestrated this showdown with Baal in front of His chosen people.  Elijah played an important part, but it was God who directed it.  God still works through His children today.  His Spirit nudges at our hearts and it is up to us to listen and follow as Elijah did so long ago.

The pagan prophets were acting on faith too, but their faith was in one that only existed in their minds.  Something that couldn’t have moved a stone or a stick of wood, much less burned anything up.

The spectators witnessed proof that God both heard Elijah’s prayer and responded.  They were so inspired by what they saw that they fell on their faces and said, “The Lord, he is the God; the Lord, he is the God.”  Elijah’s act of obedience had an impact on others besides himself.  He helped to bring about a people’s return to their one and only true God.

Elijah’s prayer proved that sincere prayers from the heart make it to the Creator of all mankind.

 

My Eye on the Ball

One of the common autism traits I both possess and enjoy immensely is “unsociable” hobbies.  It’s not that I don’t like people; I just don’t like to be around them much.  I can’t recall ever liking to play games unless I could compete with one person – myself.

My favorite one is going on a date with my tennis ball and racket at a nearby college campus. The campus has the tennis cages where there is a practice wall.  I confess it is a big treat if all the cages are empty or at least all the ones on one side of the wall.  I’ll usually play less time if there are others around, especially if accompanied by blasting I-pods.  This may sound like a boring way to play since the wall always wins every match, but I’m not out there to win.  Just play that’s all.

I don’t remember all the tips my tennis coach gave me in high school but I imagine “keeping my eye on the ball” was one of them  I know if my eye is on the ball, I improve the odds of the matches against the wall being longer.  In other words, I’ll spend more time hitting the ball and less time fetching it.

It occurred to me this is true in my daily walk with my Lord and Savior.  Just as I need to keep my eye on the ball, I need to keep my eye on Jesus.  This is easier said than done because there is the constant temptation to take my eyes off of Him and look at whatever is on my plate.  Sometimes what is on my plate has the visual appearance of a dark night without a star in the sky.

If my focus is on the darkness, I will drown in that darkness.  The depths of despair will overwhelm me.  Such as when I’m having a meltdown.  A meltdown is common to those of us on the Autism Spectrum.  There is no more such thing as a “good” meltdown as there is a good tornado.  When one comes, if my focus is on the overwhelming tension rising in my body, it just aggravates it.

A meltdown is tough but I don’t have the words to say how much it helps to feel the Lord’s presence.  I can’t explain it better than that.  His Spirit is comforting me as if He is literally holding my hand.  He directs me during the meltdown such as where I could go or what I could do to help until the storm passes.  The reassuring voice tells me to hold on; it will pass.  If I keep my eye, or focus, on Him, I will not drown in the pit of self-pity and despair.

If I keep my eye on the tennis ball, I have longer matches and more fun playing against a wall.  If I keep my eye on Jesus, life is far more enjoyable and calmer than it would otherwise be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Thorn

A thorn sticking into one’s flesh is a might uncomfortable.  I just imagine in my childhood exploring days on my Grandparent’s farm that I encountered enough thorns that I learned to be wary of thornbushes.  There are thorns on bushes and then there are thorns we encounter in our lives.  Apostle Paul knew a lot about thorns.  He had one according to 2 Corinthians 12:7-10:

And lest I should be exalted above measure by the abundance of the revelations, a thorn in the flesh was given to me, a messenger of Satan to buffet me, lest I be exalted above measure. Concerning this thing I pleaded with the Lord three times that it might depart from me. And He said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore most gladly I will rather boast in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me. 10 Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in needs, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ’s sake. For when I am weak, then I am strong.

Paul didn’t say what the thorn was and so no one knows for sure the name of it.  The important thing isn’t what it was but how Paul chose to cope with it.  First off, he prayed about it.  Then, he continued praying about that thorn until an answer came.  The answer wasn’t what he had hoped himself.  The Lord did not remove it.  Paul accepted the answer without throwing a tantrum or cutting back on his mission trips to spread the Gospel.

Instead of removing whatever the thorn was, the Lord granted Paul the grace and strength to live with it.  Paul has a positive attitude by seeing this thorn in a different light.  Instead of seeing it as a roadblock; he saw it as something that humbled him and helped to make him a better Apostle than he might otherwise be.  In other words, it helped him from getting a swelled head over the talents the Lord did bless him with.

This thought of a thorn being a humbler makes me think of one of my country’s presidents. He wasn’t one of those born in a log cabin.  Quite the contrary!  He was born into wealth and privilege.  Even early in his career, he had his eyes on the presidency.  But on his road to the White House, he encountered a thorn in his flesh that would remain with him for the remainder of his life.  Its name was polio.

An unforgettable day for Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was when he couldn’t get out of bed on his own two feet. From then on, his legs would be useless to him.  I don’t think FDR would have been the president he was if he hadn’t been humbled by this thorn in his flesh.  I think his battle with polio inspired him to say one of his most familiar and quoted lines:  There is nothing to fear but fear itself.  FDR knew about fear; he knew about thorns.

He led a country through a depression and a world war.  He served in the Oval Office longer than his president before or after him.  But although the leader of the free world, he still had to have someone to put him to bed every night and help him up the next morning.

We all have thorns to deal with on any given day.  I discovered near the end of 2016, at the age of 58, the name of the thorn I had unknowingly lived with all my life: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  Some call it Autism, others call it mild Autism, or highly functional Autism, or Asperger’s Syndrome.   My trying to figure out which of the names suits me best is as useful as trying to figure out what Paul’s thorn was.

I perceive the negatives of ASD are the actual thorns.  I say that because there are positives to my constant companion.  I source my passion for writing as an ASD trait.  I appreciate the compliments I received from my God-given talent of writing.  But I know that if I ever were to leave the Lord out of my writing, my words would fall on deaf ears.  I often think of myself as merely taking dictation.  The Lord gives me the words.

I don’t pray for the Lord to remove my thorn.  I’m thankful that at the right time, place, and way I received the knowledge of what this thorn was called.  I cope with it better now that I am no longer in the dark about it.  My thorn gives me empathy on my job as a substitute teacher’s assistant working with children who have similar thorns.

If it wasn’t for my thorns, I reckon I’d need many servings of humble pie.

 

The Grateful One of Ten

It can be a tough road when one doesn’t follow along with one’s peers.  Even if one is on solid ground, it can be a daunting task to be the one and only left standing.  In one of the stories in the Gospel of Luke, there was such a man, a Samaritan leper.

His story is told in Luke 17:11-19.  Jesus was going through the region between Samaria and Galilee, on His way to Jerusalem. He entered a village and was approached by ten lepers.  Leprosy robbed these ten of their quality of life as well as threatened their life.  It was an isolating illness separating them from their loved ones, their home, and society.

The ten must have been an eyesore to behold, but Jesus did not look away from them.  While keeping their distance, in unison, they pleaded to Jesus for mercy.  He did not turn a deaf ear to their cries.  Jesus instructed them to show themselves to the priests and like obedient children, they did as they were told.  As they went their way, the horrid disease left their bodies.  The leper spots were gone.

They continued on their way without looking back except for one.  The Samarian in the group turned back to where Jesus was and fell at Jesus’s feet. He thanked Jesus for healing his body.  Jesus asked, “Were not ten made clean?  But the other nine, where are they?  Was none of them found to return and give praise to God except this STRANGER?”

It’s music to my ears to hear a “thank you”. Since I should treat people the way I want to be treated, these two words should be words I use frequently instead of rarely.

Jesus told the healed man to go on his way; that his faith had made him well.  By faith, the stranger called out to Jesus for mercy.  By faith, he turned back from the other nine and thanked the One who took away his leper spots.  By faith, he did the right thing.  Although he was the stranger among them, he was the grateful one of the ten.

A Damsel’s Answered Prayer

The name “Rhoda” may not be the first female name you’d think of if someone asked you to name a female character in the Bible.  She didn’t receive much Bible coverage since she is only mentioned once in the 12th chapter of Acts.  This chapter is primarily about Apostle Peter and his miraculous escape from prison.  Rhoda had a supporting role in the story.  She just answered a knock at the gate and reported what she saw.  That was the easy part.  The hard part was handling the doubt and skepticism from those around her.

Peter had been put in prison by King Herod who had James the brother of John killed with the sword (12:2). Not wanting to leave anything to chance, Herod had 16 of his soldiers to guard one man, Peter.  Church members prayed for God to rescue Peter from the hands of Herod.  An angel appeared to Peter and broke the chains off his hands.  Peter walked out of prison passing all the guards without any interference from them.  Peter went to the house of Mary the mother of John, surname Mark.

This is where the damsel, Rhoda, comes into the story.  She was one of those inside Mary’s house who were praying for Peter.  She perhaps was probably fairly young since a damsel was a young unmarried woman.  Peter knocked at the outside gate’s door.  Rhoda heard the knock and went outside.  Peter must have spoken because it says in verse 14: And when she knew Peter’s voice, she opened not the gate for gladness, but ran in, and told how Peter stood before the gate.  

Bless her heart, Rhoda was so excited that she forgot all about letting Peter in and runs into the house to tell them their prayers had been answered.  According to verse 15 of this chapter, what she got in return for her good news was being told she was mad.  Perhaps because of her age, they didn’t take her seriously – a child seen but not heard.  Or, too, although they were praying for Peter’s deliverance, their faith was weak.  Maybe feeling a sense of hopelessness since they had only recently lost James who died by the sword.

I do relate to their doubts.  Sometimes I pray about something but without the faith that I should.  That the outcome is already written on the wall, so to speak, and there isn’t much of anything that can be done to change the expected dire outcome.  The church members were perhaps expecting the worst news that Peter would meet a similar fate as James.

Rhoda stood up to this skepticism by insisting that Peter was outside.  She refused to back down even though they didn’t believe her.  When she wouldn’t back down, they still shrugged it off with saying she had seen an angel.

Have you ever tried to convince someone of something you took on faith to be the truth and was met with disbelief?

I’ve told a number of people about how I learned I was living on the Autism Spectrum and how I believe the Lord brought it all about.  I don’t believe the who, where, when, and how was a matter of coincidence.  When it came down to it, the Lord gave me my diagnosis when He saw fit to give it to me in the way that He did.  Some folks take me at my word and are supportive but I have met some skeptics.  It can be discouraging to receive a less than supportive response when it is about something you are so enthused about as Rhoda was about Peter.

Rhoda did not have to wait long for vindication.  Peter continued knocking outside and when they opened the door, they found out Rhoda wasn’t mad after all and that Peter wasn’t an angel.  It doesn’t say whether Rhoda said something like, “I told you so”, or not.  She sure had a right to since they had accused her of being crazy.

This young woman set the example of praying with faith.  She wasn’t praying for Peter just for the ritual of doing so.  She believed her prayer for Peter went beyond the house ceiling.  She was thrilled to see Peter but I don’t think she was as shocked of Peter’s return as the other people who didn’t take Rhoda’s word for it.  They didn’t believe until they saw Peter with their own eyes.  Although they prayed for Peter’s survival, they had some serious doubt that they would ever see Peter again.

When telling others about the Lord working in our lives, sometimes we’ll be met with skepticism.  Perhaps even from people in our inner circle.  Rhoda, after all, wasn’t in the midst of enemies but with fellow believers.  We must stand firm in what we believe to be an answered prayer or a conviction on our hearts to do whatever even when others tell us we are crazy.

Such as some might have thought Noah was crazy when he was building an ark, Daniel facing a lion’s den for defying King’s orders by praying to God, and Abraham going on a journey to a promised land even though he did not know where he was going.  We know the outcome of these Bible stories.  The ark withstood the flood, the lions didn’t touch Daniel, and if you look on a globe or world map, you’ll find a country named Israel.

 

Trust

 Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding.

Proverbs 3:5

This verse was not a hard one for me to memorize.  It is short and to the point.  A wise saying to keep in one’s heart.  I admit, though, this proverb is much easier for me to recite than it is to live it.  But if I don’t live it, it doesn’t do me much good to recite it.

My day job is a substitute teacher’s aide.  Sometimes my assignment takes me to gym classes.  Besides tying shoes, I am often asked by a student to hold something for them until they are finished playing a game or until after class.  The student puts it in my hands with complete trust.  They may sweat through gym class because the coach is giving them a workout, but not because they fear I will lose what they have entrusted me with.  They don’t fear I will claim ownership and not give it back to them.  That’s how it should be between me and the Lord with items on my plate.  I should hand whatever it may be over to Jesus just like a student hands over a valuable.

I can’t keep storms from popping up in my life no more than I can control the weather.  If it were up to me, our daily forecast would be sunny, clear skies, 70 temps, and a nice breeze.  It doesn’t work that way with the weather and it sure doesn’t in life.  There’s always a life storm, big or small, brewing up somewhere.

I do have a choice about how I respond to stormy weather.  The option of taking matters into my own hands, wading through it myself, is as effective as my singing the rhyme, “Rain, rain, go away…” and the rain obliges.  The other option is Proverbs 3:5.

A good start to any lemon tossed at me is a talk with Jesus.  That’s not all there is to it though.  It is waiting and acting on the Lord’s guidance or instruction as I make my way through the storm day by day.  He knows where I need to be on any given day, who I may need to meet, and what words I need to say.  It may be a short rain shower or it may be stormy weather for a long spell.

One of the opportunities to live this proverb was late in 2016 when I realized that Autism wasn’t something that children had or someone else’s kid had or an adult had who acted a little strange at times.  I learned the word applied to me too and it was the “it” behind why I have long felt I was the lone cow in the pasture.  Knowing there is an “it behind it and what “it” is, is of tremendous help, but it doesn’t cure or change it.  It doesn’t stop a meltdown volcano from erupting.  It doesn’t make it easier to socially interact without the exhaustion afterward.  It doesn’t make things easier that are a snap for others.  The only thing to do to is to heed the proverb.  That in good times and bad times of living with my companion, I trust in Him and not try to figure out my Autism.

The sun will come out.  I haven’t been in a storm that it didn’t.  It didn’t always end as I had wished for in my dreams.  It just ended for the best.  How do I know I got the best outcome?  That’s where trusting the Lord knows better than my own understanding comes into play.

Jesus and a Man on a Mat

Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. 

Hebrews 11:1

A short definition of a word that isn’t hard to find in the Bible.  I haven’t looked up how many verses in the Bible has this five letter word, but I have no doubt whatsoever that if I went to work looking them all up, it would keep me busy for a while.

In the Gospels that give us an account of Jesus’s life on this earth, there are many stories where you’ll find the word faith.  One of them is in Luke, chapter 5, verses 17-26.  It’s about Jesus, a man on a mat, and some of the man’s friends.

One day as Jesus was teaching, there was a huge turnout that included Pharisees and teachers of the law who had come from every village of Galilee and from Judea and Jerusalem.  From what the scriptures tell us, they didn’t gather to hear Jesus because they were His believers.  They had their own interpretation of the law and it wasn’t quite in sync with Jesus’s teachings.  Some may have sought to use Jesus’s own words against Him.  Others in the crowd were perhaps curious from what they had heard about Jesus’s healing powers and were more interested in miracles than Jesus’s teaching.  And, maybe there were some actual believers in the crowd too.

Among the crowd was a man who was paralyzed and was being carried on a mat, or couch, by some of his friends.  They weren’t there to simply get a glimpse of Jesus to satisfy their curiosity.  They weren’t skeptics for if they had been, I don’t think they would have gone to all the effort they did to get Jesus’s attention.  They must have heard about Jesus’s power to heal and sought Jesus for the healing of the man whose legs were useless to him.

The crowd was so huge they couldn’t make their way through to get Jesus’s attention.  Some other friends might have told their paralyzed friend they had done all they could and might as well head back home.  Perhaps better luck the next time Jesus was in town.  But not these friends.  They put their minds together and came up with another way of reaching Jesus.  A rather unusual effort under the circumstances.  They climbed up on the roof carrying their friend and lowered him on his mat through the tiles into the mìddle of the crowd right in front of Jesus.

When Jesus saw their faith in action, He said unto the man on the mat “Man, thy sins are forgiven thee”.  The man who could not walk was a sinner.  The friends who lowered him down from the roof were sinners.  The Pharisees and teachers of the law were sinners.  Everyone in the crowd were sinners.  The only one who didn’t need forgiveness was the One who could forgive sins and cause the lame to walk.  

The Pharisees and the teachers were buzzing like bees reasoning among each other, “Who is this which speaketh blasphemies? Who can forgive sins, but God alone?”

Jesus knew what the buzz was all about.  He replied to their reasoning by saying, “What reason ye in your hearts?  Whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Rise up and walk?  But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power upon earth to forgive sins, I say unto thee, Arise, and take up thy couch, and go into thine house.”

The man immediately stood before them, walked out on his own two feet, and went back to his house praising God all the way home.  His faith and that of his friends had paid off.  If they had not taken him or had given up due to the huge crowd, the story would have had a different ending.  It should be noted the man was rich in more ways than one.  He had friends who cared enough to carry him to Jesus.  

The healed man and his friends were not the only ones who were amazed.  The crowd was amazed and glorified God.  Some hearts were changed from skeptics to believers.  They had seen strange things that day that would stay with them for the rest of their days.

Miracles didn’t stop when Jesus returned to the Father.  I’ve heard doctors speak of patients’ recovery they had no medical explanation for.  I’ve heard of people outliving their death sentences handed down by their doctors.  It’s a comfort to know that events happen every day that defies logic.  If only what we could see and explain with human reasoning is all that ever happened in this world, what would be the point of faith and hope?

If you ever had a prayer answered, as I have many times, you have witnessed a “strange” thing as that crowd did so long ago.

 

Meltdown Degrees

My meltdowns are at varying degrees.  One can be in the 30’s (a short upset), in the 60’s (a longer teary-eyed fit), or in the 90’s (when hopefully the only thing I’ll throw around the room is a pillow).

My foremost coping skill is a talk with Jesus.  Just telling him whatever is going on inside of me is the best place to start conquering the meltdown.  Oh, I could talk to someone which is not bad advice, but I seldom take that option.  It carries the risk of the person advising me to calm down.  Telling me to do such when I’m in meltdown country is like holding a red flag in front of a bull.

Sometimes I walk into situations where the odds of having a meltdown increase tremendously.  Such as going to the $1.00 store a few days before Easter.  That was a bad idea.

Easter decorations were flying off the shelf.  I don’t like to shop anywhere where there’s a crowd.  However, since I needed some items in that store at the affordable price of a dollar, I took the meltdown risk.  I’m a miser at heart too.

There wasn’t that big of a line when I walked in, but it seemed like when I went to get in line, there had been a cattle call to get in line.  I stood waiting while three ladies who were together separately purchased oodles of Easter bunnies, baskets, eggs, etc.  Now I knew, rationally speaking, they had every right as I did to be there.  But sitting through their purchases raised my odds of a meltdown.

Before I got out of the parking lot, I had to wait for cars to slowly, and I do mean slowly, back out of their parking space.  That’s what one should do when backing out, but I wasn’t thinking rationally at that point.  I started having one of those short meltdowns.  No tears but tension running throughout my body.  My steering wheel got a beating.  I shouldn’t have been driving but it was too far to walk home.

My next stop was what I call my “toy store”, Best Buy!  It was on my official “Saturday Morning Shopping Plan” that was written in my mind before I embarked.  It is my favorite store because I possess a common “autism” trait of collecting things and what I collect is in that store.

While browsing inside my “utopia”,  the crisis passed.  My anxiety level shifted downward.  I came home feeling extra tired because a meltdown, even a short one, can be draining.  There won’t always be a Best Buy around when I need one, but on that day, I coped as best I could at Best.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joshua, Israel, and a Wall

“By faith, the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compassed about seven days.”

“They” were the Children of Israel, God’s chosen people.  Their leader at the time was Joshua who took over the reins after Moses’s death.  Jericho was a city surround by a wall.  God told Joshua the city was theirs for the taking, BUT…  There was a but.  God didn’t hand it over to them on a silver platter.  Instead, God gave Joshua a battle plan to deliver to His people.

God delivered Joshua an unusual strategic battle plan.  He was to have his armed men march around the city once each day, for six days, in total silence.  No use of weapons, no jumping over the wall, and to keep their mouths shut.  There were seven priests, too, bearing seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark.  On the seventh day, they were to march around the city seven times, with the priests blowing the trumpets.  On the 7th time around, when the priests blew a loud blast with the ram’s horn, and the people heard the sound of the trumpet, they were all to shout with a great shout; then the wall of the city would fall down flat.

This wasn’t the typical way to conquer a city.  I doubt Joshua in his wildest dreams could have come up with the plan all by himself.  We don’t know if he had any internal doubts about it or not.  He was human after all and it would have been understandable if he had.  However, maybe he was okay with it from the start with the attitude of whatever you say, Lord, I’ll do it.

He relayed God’s instructions to the Israelites.  There may have been those, if not all of them, who were first taken aback by the plan.  A week is a long time to march around the wall of a city inhabited by their enemy.  What was to stop their enemy from attacking them as they marched on any of those seven days?  My point is this wasn’t a simple task because their lives were on the line.

Joshua and the children of Israel followed the plan.  If they had any doubts, they conquered them.  On the seventh day, the Israelites marched around the walls of Jericho seven times.  At the seventh time around the wall, the men gave a great shout, and the walls of Jericho fell down flat just as God said they would.

In any of life’s battles, big or small, there are options.  One can ignore it, give up, or attempt to handle it on their own.  Another option is by faith, praying to our Father for instruction and following whatever that instruction may be that He lays upon our heart.  This is the option the children of Israel took as they marched around a wall for a week.  And they found it to be the option that gave them victory.

 

 

The Outspoken Disciple

Jesus chose twelve men to be His disciples.  I don’t have their names memorized even though I can recite the names of the Bible and there is 66 of them.   Disciples who had less Bible coverage, such as Bartholomew, are hard for me to remember.  On the other hand, I have no problem remembering Peter’s name.

Peter’s personality is in stark contrast to mine.  Of the twelve, he was the outspoken one. He reminds me of the kid in school who was always raising his hand when the teacher popped a question.  I was the one hoping someone like Peter will answer the question or ask the question I wish someone else would ask.  He wasn’t one to keep his thoughts to himself. He said what he thought.  He was bold and energetic.  While I’m a born follower, Peter was a born leader.

One of the stories about Peter occurred after Jesus had fed the multitude of five thousand men plus women and children.  Jesus sent his disciples off on a boat.  The Lord went up to a mountainside to pray by himself.  Now I can relate to Jesus wanting quiet time.  Time to myself can be precious when overwhelmed by too much social interaction.  This was one of a number occasions where Jesus went off by himself to talk to His Father.  He loved His disciples and the multitudes, but He needed to get away from them sometimes to have quiet time with His Father.

When evening came, Jesus returned from the mountain but the disciples were in a boat considerable distance from land.  The water was unstable because of the high winds.  The disciples were astonished when they saw Jesus coming towards them walking on water.   This wasn’t the first time they had witnessed Jesus perform amazing acts, such as changing water into wine or giving sight to the blind, but His walking on water was a new one on them. Were they seeing a ghost?  Were they all having the same dream?

Jesus told them to not be afraid. He sought to assure them it was Him and all was well. As Peter often did, he wasted no time in speaking up.  He stated if the one walking on water was truly the Lord, tell him to come to Him on the water.  Jesus told Peter to come and so he climbed out of the boat.

Peter was walking on water too. He was doing fine until he turned his eyes off Jesus and focused on the wind instead. That’s when he began to sink. He cried out for the Lord to save him.  The Lord reached out His hand and caught him.  The Lord asked Peter, “Why did you doubt?”

I can’t be hard on Peter.  Many a time my attention has been diverted to the wind.  I focus on what I can see that can be terribly frightening at times.  I identify with the man who cried out to Jesus that he believed, but please help me with my unbelief.

Even though Peter had witnessed time and time again of Jesus performing miracles, he had times of doubt.  Peter later denied Christ three times near the end of Jesus’s time on this Earth.  He could have wallowed in grief about his denial.  He could have done what Judas did and took his life.  But instead, by faith, he got up and kept going.  The Lord put Peter back to work before He went back to the Father.  Peter went on to become a leader in the early church.

What’s important in Peter’s story isn’t that he fell, it’s that the outspoken disciple got up.